Posts from Hardwicke

Ten-day delay in filing cost budget was serious but so what!

Much has been written about the court’s discretion to grant relief from sanctions pursuant to CPR 3.9 over recent years, due to the re-formulation of the rule in April 2013 and the landmark Court of Appeal decision in Mitchell v News Group Newspapers Ltd. The strictness of the approach in Mitchell led to an outcry … Continue reading Ten-day delay in filing cost budget was serious but so what!

Revisiting reasonable skill and care: have construction professionals lost Bolam protection without even noticing?

In recent years there has been increasing interest as to whether construction professionals need to produce an end design that is fit for purpose or simply to show that they exercised reasonable skill and care. The Court of Appeal’s decision to overturn the first instance judgment in MT Hojgaard v Eon (and the first instance decision … Continue reading Revisiting reasonable skill and care: have construction professionals lost Bolam protection without even noticing?

Issues highlighted by GB Building Ltd v SFS Fire Services Ltd

Practical completion is a key concept in any construction project. It has a significant impact on a party’s rights and obligations, and represents a major milestone in the overall project timetable. Under the majority of construction projects, it marks the point at which the clock starts running for the overall transfer of risk from the … Continue reading Issues highlighted by GB Building Ltd v SFS Fire Services Ltd

Disclosure and production in construction cases

The evolution of the CPR in the wake of the Jackson reforms included the well-known introduction of the “menu” of disclosure options at CPR 31.5(7). The net effect was to promote, as appropriate and applicable, a movement away from well-established “standard” disclosure to a more tailored approach. With the accompanying provisions of CPR 31 and … Continue reading Disclosure and production in construction cases

The more things change, the more they stay the same

Every time we think the courts might have given defendants in adjudication enforcement proceedings slightly more latitude in raising their dissatisfaction with an adjudicator’s decision, the court brings us back down to earth with a bump and reminds us that, in fact, no matter how hard done by our clients feel, they will have to … Continue reading The more things change, the more they stay the same

Adjudicator had jurisdiction because rights were re-assigned in the nick of time

In Mailbox (Birmingham) Ltd v Galliford Try Construction Ltd, the TCC confirmed the armoured quality of an adjudicator’s decision, despite a valiant jurisdictional challenge. The enforcement action was set against a zigzagging tale of assignment and re-assignment…

Time waits for no man: an important decision on delays in construction contracts

The Court of Appeal’s judgment in Carillion Construction Ltd v Emcor Engineering Services Ltd and another is an important decision concerning a standard form construction contract, the JCT Domestic Sub-Contract (known as DOM/2). The court confirmed an earlier TCC decision that delays can only be calculated by extending the period of time allowed for practical completion, not by creating … Continue reading Time waits for no man: an important decision on delays in construction contracts

Paying your fair share: when can an adjudicator decide more than the notified sum must be paid?

Kersfield Developments (Bridge Road) Ltd v Bray & Slaughter Ltd is the latest authority in a line of cases providing guidance on interim payments in construction contracts under the Construction Act 1996. While a wide number of arguments were deployed in the case, perhaps the most interesting point for construction practitioners is that it offered the first … Continue reading Paying your fair share: when can an adjudicator decide more than the notified sum must be paid?

Is the TCC’s approach to summary judgment in adjudication enforcement changing?

As we are all in the process of opening our annual referral notice Christmas presents, I thought you might welcome a brief distraction by considering whether anyone will be able to enforce the pending decision in the New Year. Perhaps surprisingly, 2016 has seen some developments on this front that practitioners need to bear in … Continue reading Is the TCC’s approach to summary judgment in adjudication enforcement changing?

Time to party (over that wall) like its 1996

As the incredible rise of our transatlantic wall-building friend sets gently into the twilight of credulity, it provides us with an opportunity to get back to reality with the Party Wall etc. Act 1996 (PWA 1996). The PWA 1996 remains something of an unusual beast. For an Act that features so heavily in a construction … Continue reading Time to party (over that wall) like its 1996

Will the new Protocol for Construction and Engineering Disputes save time and cost?

The genesis of the new Protocol for Construction and Engineering Disputes, which came into effect today, was widespread concern regarding the front-loading of costs. It is this concern that has led to the introduction of a quicker, less detailed and more proportionate Protocol procedure.

Beware the dangers of uncertainty with letters of intent

Alexander Nissen QC’s recent decision in Spartafield Ltd v Penten Group Ltd brings a degree of finality to the long-running dispute between these two parties. It comes after multiple adjudications and previous proceedings in the TCC. Back in March, my colleague Ebony Alleyne discussed what was then the most recent judgment, dealing with the enforcement … Continue reading Beware the dangers of uncertainty with letters of intent

Going nuclear: Britain’s big bet on Hinkley Point

On 29 September 2016, at a private low-key ceremony in London, representatives from three of the world’s most powerful nations (France, China and the UK) met in order to sign a historic energy agreement. The goal: to build Britain’s first nuclear power plant in a generation. When completed in 2025 (if all goes to plan), … Continue reading Going nuclear: Britain’s big bet on Hinkley Point

Navigating the minefield of expert determination

Stephen Furst QC’s judgment in ZVI Construction Co LLC v University of Notre Dame (USA) in England is a recent TCC case that highlights important issues arising from expert determination clauses.

No green light to making exaggerated insurance claims but “gilding the lily” may be okay

With the Insurance Act 2015 set to come into force within the next two weeks, contractors will be turning their attention towards the new provisions to clarify their legal obligations under policies incepted after 12 August 2016. In anticipation of these significant and wide-ranging reforms to insurance contract law, the courts have begun the task … Continue reading No green light to making exaggerated insurance claims but “gilding the lily” may be okay

Common sense is over-rated

At first glance, Carillion Construction Ltd v Woods Bagot Europe Ltd and others appears to be important because it touches on a common issue in delay and disruption claims of how an extension of time is to be awarded. However, on closer inspection the case is not really about delay and disruption. It is merely another … Continue reading Common sense is over-rated

An (e)stopped clock is right twice a day. Is your engineer’s conduct a ticking time bomb?

As the deluge of smash and grab adjudications continues to percolate through the construction industry, shrewd contractors are advancing more and more creative legal submissions as a way of reviving interim payment applications that have somewhere gone awry. Twice in the past year, the TCC has been addressed on the issue of whether a contractor can … Continue reading An (e)stopped clock is right twice a day. Is your engineer’s conduct a ticking time bomb?

Know what you are dealing with: lessons learned from Murphy v Beckton

Carr J’s judgment in J Murphy & Sons Ltd v Beckton Energy Ltd offers a salutary reminder of the dangers that can befall a contractor when dealing with an unfamiliar amended contract. Not getting to grips with the operation of amended clauses, and the interplay between them, can be a trap for the unwary, as J Murphy … Continue reading Know what you are dealing with: lessons learned from Murphy v Beckton

“What are you referring to…?” The increased latitude required when considering adjudicators’ jurisdiction

With both the US and London mayoral elections gaining momentum, and leading commentators poised to offer independent research, enlivened views and sage analysis, you really would be forgiven for not having had your eyes trained on recent enforcement action in the TCC. The judgment in Penten Group Ltd v Spartafield Ltd, is therefore one you might have missed (but … Continue reading “What are you referring to…?” The increased latitude required when considering adjudicators’ jurisdiction

Is the civil courts structure review the end for the TCC?

It’s just possible that, what with keeping up on the recent spate of adjudication enforcement decisions, and wondering whether Brexit would mean that English clubs can’t compete in Europe, you might have missed the fact that Briggs LJ is in the middle of conducting a comprehensive review of the civil courts structure (and the interim report … Continue reading Is the civil courts structure review the end for the TCC?

Pay less notices under the Construction Act 1996

As I predicted in my blog post two weeks ago, the TCC has now been addressed on the argument that an out of time payment notice can stand as a valid pay less notice under the provisions of the Construction Act 1996. In Grove Developments Ltd v Balfour Beatty Regional Construction Ltd, Grove sought (in the alternative), a … Continue reading Pay less notices under the Construction Act 1996

Henia v Beck: time for a rethink?

Google the decision in Henia Investments Inc v Beck Interiors Ltd and you will find a raft of articles championing the decision as adding yet further weight to the argument that payment applications submitted by the “payee” must be clear and unambiguous. However, what is noticeably absent from the commentary is any discussion regarding the … Continue reading Henia v Beck: time for a rethink?

The new stomping ground: validity of payment applications

Since the consequences of failing to serve a valid and timely payment notice or pay less notice can be severe (see ISG Construction Ltd v Seevic College), it perhaps should come as no surprise that in recent cases, there has been increasing attention on the validity of the application for payment because, without this, there … Continue reading The new stomping ground: validity of payment applications

It means what it says on the tin: contract interpretation in a post-Arnold v Britton world

For a number of years it seemed as if the law had gone soft in its old age. It began by telling us that, when construing the terms of a contract, we shouldn’t allow the literal words to mask the true objective intention. As Lord Steyn said (in Sirius International v FAI): “[T]he tyrant Temures … Continue reading It means what it says on the tin: contract interpretation in a post-Arnold v Britton world

The current status of the complex structure theory

Nearly a quarter of a century has passed since Lord Bridge’s discussion of the complex structure theory in Murphy v Brentwood. One might have reasonably expected that in the years that have passed, the position of the complex structure theory in English tort law would have finally been settled upon. However, this has not been … Continue reading The current status of the complex structure theory

“Fair presentation of risk” and the Insurance Act 2015: what does it mean for the construction industry?

The Insurance Act 2015, which does not come into force until August 2016, changes the way in which insurance is conducted. The delay in commencement of the Act is intended, at least in part, to give insurers time to change their policy wording and procedures. It is likely that some of the new policy wordings … Continue reading “Fair presentation of risk” and the Insurance Act 2015: what does it mean for the construction industry?

Avoiding a blind alley: proving causation in an uncertain world

The Court of Appeal (in Graves v Brouwer) has taken the opportunity to re-visit the vexed question of how you should go about proving causation where there are a series of possible causes and, perhaps more importantly, how you shouldn’t do it. Anyone faced with a fire claim would do well to take heed. The … Continue reading Avoiding a blind alley: proving causation in an uncertain world